‘All waters speak the same language’

The Curatorial Fellowship welcomes artist Kriss Zilgalvis to tell the stories of our North Sea waters. ​Stories told by the Sea explores our human desire to discover, hear and understand the unknown; to send a message and receive a reply, to understand and be understood.

During the initial research stage, Zilgalvis employs mapping and modelling technologies that are more commonly used in practices such as architecture, engineering and archaeology to document the unseen landscapes beneath the waters surface. As of the 3/03 the gallery will be transformed into an active working space, as this information is transformed into a series of sculptural objects. During this time, visitors to The Worm are still welcome to access the resource library whilst also having a unique opportunity to witness the work in progress and meet the artist.

Join us in The Worm on the Thursday 5th March 2020 to unveil the resulting objects. There will be an informal presentation on the project and the research behind it.

In a sense, ​Stories told by the Sea is the artist’s answer to the exhibition ​Stories told by Water – The River Daugava​, (2015) which took place in Riga, both in the urban environment of AB Dam Park and on the River Daugava. With participants Dzintars Zilgalvis, Dace Zilgalve and Kaspars Avots, ​Stories told by the Sea ​connects Peacock Visual Arts with ​NOASS Arts Centre​, one of the oldest independent cultural organisations in Latvia. Finding its home in two floating buildings, the arts centre has over 20 years of experience promoting interdisciplinary projects and supporting experiments in visual art.

As an artist, Kriss Zilgalvis’s work could be compared to a scientist whose research and creative process is equally as important as the end result. The instruments used in Kriss’s creative works are often comparable to other sectors, e.g. art, architecture, engineering and science. His works of art include performance art, multimedia installations and sculptures in the urban environment. His art projects, installations and performance art events have taken place in Copenhagen, Seoul, New York, Lahti, Riga, Rotterdam and many other places. He has recently completed work on a sculpture for Riga Cathedral (2018), which is dedicated to Latvia’s independence and is made from the world’s biggest ever glass alloys of their type.

The Associates is run by Peacock Visual Arts and began as a pilot program in 2018. This year’s programme brings together five practitioners working in Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire and is Scotland’s first fully-funded Curatorial Fellowship for visual arts. This year’s cohort includes; Joss Allen, Caitlin Dick, Phoebe McBride, Svetlana Panova and Abby Beatrice Quick. The Fellowship has been running since May 2019 through a series of intensive sessions, reading groups and discussions with local and international organisations and practitioners. The content

of the programme is informed by the needs and interests of The Fellows and developed by the collective group, with support from PVA staff.

www.peacockvisualarts.com/curatorialfellowship

The programme is supported by the Aberdeen Place Programme, a partnership between Aberdeen City Council and Creative Scotland. This year’s programme brings together five practitioners working in Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire and is Scotland’s first fully-funded Curatorial Fellowship for visual arts. This year’s cohort includes; Joss Allen, Caitlin Dick, Phoebe McBride, Svetlana Panova and Abby Beatrice Quick. The Fellowship has been running since May 2019 through a series of intensive sessions, reading groups and discussions with local and international organisations and practitioners. The content of the programme is informed by the needs and interests of The Fellows and developed by the collective group, with support from PVA staff.